We are Voting for our Kids and Grandkids this Election

   

This survey was created by parents4climate.caFor Our Grandkids, and BCSEA.org

The climate crisis threatens our children and grandchildren's quality of life now and into the future. We want to see real action from MLAs on climate change and a clean and just economy. 

We contacted all candidates in the Victoria-area ridings and asked them to answer five questions. You'll find their responses below (we've colour-coded the ridings to make it easier for you to find your candidates' responses). 

Victoria Beacon Hill

Oak Bay- Gordon Head

Saanich South

Saanich North and the Islands

Langford-Juan de Fuca

Esquimalt-Metchosin

Victoria-Swan Lake

 

1. Cleaner, Greener Future For Kids

Parents want to see the possibility of a positive future for children but what we see is billions of dollars continuing to be spent on subsidies that support the fossil fuel industry. 

Specifically, what will you do to support education and job training so that our children can participate, and become leaders in, a new, green economy?

Victoria Beacon Hill
Karen Bill, Liberal A BC Liberal government will ensure decisions in every Ministry across government are
made with environmental improvement as an overarching goal.
For details on our plans for education and job training, please see our platform.
Grace Lore, NDP No response received to date
Jenn Neilson, Green No response received to date
Jordan Reichert, Independent No response received to date

 

Oak Bay-Gordon Head
Florian Castle, Communist Party of BC No response received to date
Nicole Duncan, Green The B.C. Greens recognize that it is imperative that we urgently build a diverse, clean economy in order to have economic stability. We need to provide transition support for workers in sunset industries like oil and gas to re-train and use their skills to build a clean energy future for British Columbia. We need to be prioritizing a more circular economy that keeps jobs in the province, and a long-term vision for the future. The B.C. Greens are in full support of the provincial carbon tax and predictable, regular increases; in order to promote emission reductions and send a market signal that fosters technological improvements and attracts innovative businesses, the rate needs to continue to predictably increase each year and needs to be significantly higher to drive behaviour change. The pursuit of LNG is the pursuit of short-term profit over long-term sustainability. We should be retooling our workforce for the 21st century in line with Clean B.C., by embracing innovation and renewable energy technologies can drive huge economic gains for our province that will last for many generations to come. The B.C. Greens would stop funding oil and gas through subsidies to lead the way forward into a sustainable economy, and do everything possible to stop fracking in British Columbia as soon as is possible in line with a just transition.
Roxanne Helm, Liberal Victoria has a large and growing tech sector. I would like to see coding become a meaningful part of our school curriculum so that our kids can thrive in what is a very green industry.
Murray Rankin, NDP Our children and grandchildren are the future. Firstly, we need to make sure education is affordable and accessible to all. That’s why John Horgan’s government created the needs-based, up-front BC Access Grant of up to $4,000, eliminated interest on BC student loans and made post-secondary education tuition-free for former youth in care. We’ll continue to build on these programs. Across BC, John Horgan’s government has added 2900 new tech-related seats in colleges and universities to prepare students for the future workforce. If re-elected, we’ll add 200 more, so people across the province, particularly youth, can gain the knowledge and tools they need to become leaders in our changing, green economy.

 

Saanich South
Kate O'Connor, Green The BC Greens recognise that investing in education is the single most important investment that can be made in our society and it starts with our K-12 system and moves through to post secondary education. The strategy here focuses on the longer term security provided by having the education and skills to be part of the post-pandemic economy. Initiatives here include additional COVID funding for online learning and hybrid options, new funding to support the number of counsellors in our education system, and a province-wide plan to address racism that exists on campuses.
Lana Popham, NDP No response received to date
Rishi Sharma, Liberal A BC Liberal government will ensure decisions in every Ministry across government are made with environmental improvement as an overarching goal.
For details on our plans for education and job training, please see our platform.

 

Saanich North & the Islands
Zeb King, NDP No response received to date
Adam Olsen, Green This is a really important question. I am proud to stand with the BC Greens on this one. We are the only party to promise to end taxpayer funded subsidies to the fossil fuel industry. The provincial government has committed more than $6 billion to multinational corporations to convince them to frack and liquify in our province. These corporations do not have a business case here otherwise. We will reinvest that money into economic sectors that will help us get to the clean economy that we are committed to. This reinvestment includes funding reskilling workers in fossil fuels to guarantee them a job in the clean economy, supporting new educational initiatives to support youth prepare for a career post-graduation as well as funding seats in post-secondary that support the development of the clean economy.
Stephen P. Roberts, Liberal A BC Liberal government will ensure decisions in every Ministry across government are made with environmental improvement as an overarching goal.
For details on our plans for education and job training, please see our platform.

 

Langford-Juan de Fuca
Gord Baird, Green With education the Green Party has announced its platform to support Early Childhood Education through a series of changes, including bringing early childhood education into the education system, offering the ECE program for free for children 3-4 years of age. Personally my position has been to support subsidized skills training and re-training in a rapidly shifting society where trades and skills are forced to adapt at break-neck speeds. University education should have subsidized costs for those who wish to attend, but means otherwise exclude them, and a loans system not based on an interest bearing platform.
Kelly Darwin, Liberal A BC Liberal government will ensure decisions in every Ministry across government are made with environmental improvement as an overarching goal.
For details on our plans for education and job training, please see our platform.
John Horgan, NDP BC is already emerging as a leader in clean technology and our government is committed to helping everyone in BC get the skills and training they need to find a well-paid job in the emerging low-carbon economy. In January 2018, our newly-elected government began funding the creation of 2,900 new spaces for students in tech-related college and university programs across BC. This was the first significant investment in tech programming for more than a decade. A re-elected BC NDP Government will double-down on that work, by creating an additional 2000 spaces over the next 4 years. We are also investing in on-line learning. Our economic recovery plan invests $14 million to provide scholarships for people upskilling for the digital economy with online courses. A re-elected NDP government will build on that investment with continued funding for future years. We know that education is the first step towards a job in the new economy, but hands-on training and work experience is also important. We will help more people get paid jobs with innovative BC startups by expanding the successful ISI program – with a priority on placements for women, Indigenous people, transitioning workers and others.
Tyson Reil Strandlund, Communist Party of BC No response received to date

 

Esquimalt-Metchosin
Mitzi Dean, NDP No response received to date
Andy Mackinnon, Green Well, to begin with, BC Greens is the only Party that won't commit "billions of dollars ... on subsidies that support the fossil fuel industry". Instead, we'll support initiatives to increase education and training in what you refer to as "a new, green economy". We need to plan today for where the jobs and economy are heading.
Desta McPherson, Independent No response received to date
RJ Senko, Liberal A BC Liberal government will ensure decisions in every Ministry across government are made with environmental improvement as an overarching goal.
For details on our plans for education and job training, please see our platform.

 

Victoria-Swan Lake
Rob Fleming, NDP No response received to date
Annemieke Holthuis, Green No response received to date
Walt Parsons, Communist Party of BC No response received to date
Jenn Smith, Independent No response received to date
David Somerville, Liberal A BC Liberal government will ensure decisions in every Ministry across government are made with environmental improvement as an overarching goal.
For details on our plans for education and job training, please see our platform.

 

2. NG & LNG exports

The production and export of natural gas and coal contribute jobs and revenues to BC’s economy, but there is an urgent need to radically reduce fossil fuel use world-wide to minimize the harm of global climate change.
 
If elected, what steps would you take in the upcoming term to address fossil fuel production and exports in BC?

 

Victoria Beacon Hill
Karen Bill, Liberal We all know that the world is moving away from oil within our lifetimes. BC is well placed for this challenge with our strong clean and green hydro resources that provide all of our electricity.
Our next challenge is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation and buildings. That means that we will need to invest in making electric transportation more widely available, and updating our building codes. We are really good at this, and right here in BC we even have world-leading technology for innovations such as carbon capture. So, let’s kick-start the change by planning for solar and wind power, preparing for increased reliance on electricity instead of oil, and
making BC a leader once again in climate policy.
Grace Lore, NDP No response received to date
Jenn Neilson, Green No response received to date
Jordan Reichert, Independent No response received to date

 

Oak Bay-Gordon Head
Florian Castle, Communist Party of BC No response received to date
Nicole Duncan, Green The B.C. Greens would stop funding oil and gas through subsidies to lead the way forward into a sustainable economy, and do everything possible to stop fracking in British Columbia as soon as is possible in line with a just transition for workers.
Roxanne Helm, Liberal I would like to see government support initiatives that serve to reduce demand for fossil fuel in our everyday use. I see NG and LNG as positive steps on our journey to eliminating the use of fossil fuel in our economy.
Murray Rankin, NDP I’m running for the BC NDP because I know they’re actually committed to fighting climate change and they have the tools to do it! And if elected, I want to bring my environmental background and knowledge to the forefront of these issues. I will not compromise on our targets of reducing emissions by 40% by 2030 and reaching net-zero by 2050. We’ll do this by investing in BC carbon-capture technology, accelerating energy efficient retrofits, expanding our zero-emission vehicle program, reviewing royalties from an environmental lens and employing best-in-the-world emission detection.

 

Saanich South
Kate O'Connor, Green The BC Greens commit to be carbon neutral by 2045 matching California. They also commit to ending fossil fuel subsidies.
Lana Popham, NDP No response received to date
Rishi Sharma, Liberal We all know that the world is moving away from oil within our lifetimes. BC is well
placed for this challenge with our strong clean and green hydro resources that provide
all of our electricity.
Our next challenge is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation and
buildings. That means that we will need to invest in making electric transportation more widely available, and updating our building codes. We are really good at this, and right here in BC we even have world-leading technology
for innovations such as carbon capture. So, let’s kick-start the change by planning for
solar and wind power, preparing for increased reliance on electricity instead of oil, and
making BC a leader once again in climate policy.

 

Saanich North & the Islands
Zeb King, NDP No response received to date
Adam Olsen, Green We will stop taxpayer funded subsidies of the industry. That will address the expansion of the industries. We will support workers transition to the clean economy and shrink the industry.
Stephen P. Roberts, Liberal We all know that the world is moving away from oil within our lifetimes. BC is well
placed for this challenge with our strong clean and green hydro resources that provide
all of our electricity.
Our next challenge is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation and
buildings. That means that we will need to invest in making electric transportation more widely available, and updating our building codes. We are really good at this, and right here in BC we even have world-leading technology
for innovations such as carbon capture. So, let’s kick-start the change by planning for
solar and wind power, preparing for increased reliance on electricity instead of oil, and
making BC a leader once again in climate policy.

 

Langford-Juan de Fuca
Gord Baird, Green Neither the Green Party nor I support fossil fuel subsidies. Some industries run their course of relevance - wagon wheel makers are no longer needed. A skills retraining program is critical. On the financial side - the loss of royalties, the NDP presently provides $1 billion in subsidies versus the $200 million in royalties; stopping subsidies and lost royalties is actually a net benefit. I have long been a leader in sustainable energy, working with the BCSEA to revamp BC Hydro's net metering program. My wife and I have always been known as strong advocates for a just and equitable energy transition.
Kelly Darwin, Liberal We all know that the world is moving away from oil within our lifetimes. BC is well
placed for this challenge with our strong clean and green hydro resources that provide
all of our electricity.
Our next challenge is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation and
buildings. That means that we will need to invest in making electric transportation more widely available, and updating our building codes. We are really good at this, and right here in BC we even have world-leading technology
for innovations such as carbon capture. So, let’s kick-start the change by planning for
solar and wind power, preparing for increased reliance on electricity instead of oil, and
making BC a leader once again in climate policy.
John Horgan, NDP Our CleanBC plan is the strongest climate action plan in North America and we are working hard to create a clean-energy future for British Columbians and the world. The transition to a low carbon economy will not occur overnight. In addition to making BC a leader in clean technology and building the low-carbon economy of the future, we are working with industry to lower their emissions today. Our 2020 platform expands and strengthens our CleanBC plan to reduce our industrial emissions, including in the oil and gas sector. A re-elected BC NDP government would: Ramp up CleanBC’s industrial emissions strategy: We’ll provide additional funding for our CleanBC industrial emissions strategy so that more mines, pulp mills, oil and gas processing plants, and other industrial facilities can reduce harmful emissions and move to cleaner operations. Expand CleanBC and our zero-emissions vehicle program to industrial vehicles: With heavy vehicles being a large and growing source of harmful emissions, it’s essential we move now to green-up BC industrial transportation. We will expand CleanBC’s SUVI program to get more trucks, buses, ports, airports, and marine vessels off fossil fuels. Employ best-in-the-world emission detection: To make sure our reduction goals are being met, we’ll employ world-leading regulations and technologies to detect and reduce harmful methane emissions. Fast-track our industrial electrification strategy: By working with the federal government and BC Hydro, we can expand electrification infrastructure to make it easier for industries to go green. Reviewing royalties from an environmental lens: We will conduct a comprehensive review of oil and natural gas royalty credits
Tyson Reil Strandlund, Communist Party of BC No response received to date

 

Esquimalt-Metchosin
Mitzi Dean, NDP No response received to date
Andy Mackinnon, Green BC Greens do not support current or future plans to develop and export BC's coal, oil and natural gas. We need to fund and facilitate a just transition to renewable energy sources.
Desta McPherson, Independent No response received to date
RJ Senko, Liberal We all know that the world is moving away from oil within our lifetimes. BC is well
placed for this challenge with our strong clean and green hydro resources that provide
all of our electricity.
Our next challenge is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation and
buildings. That means that we will need to invest in making electric transportation more widely available, and updating our building codes. We are really good at this, and right here in BC we even have world-leading technology
for innovations such as carbon capture. So, let’s kick-start the change by planning for
solar and wind power, preparing for increased reliance on electricity instead of oil, and
making BC a leader once again in climate policy.

 

Victoria-Swan Lake
Rob Fleming, NDP No response received to date
Annemieke Holthuis, Green No response received to date
Walt Parsons, Communist Party of BC No response received to date
Jenn Smith, Independent No response received to date
David Somerville, Liberal We all know that the world is moving away from oil within our lifetimes. BC is well placed for this challenge with our strong clean and green hydro resources that provide all of our electricity.
Our next challenge is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation and buildings. That means that we will need to invest in making electric transportation more widely available, and updating our building codes. We are really good at this, and right here in BC we even have world-leading technology for innovations such as carbon capture. So, let’s kick-start the change by planning for solar and wind power, preparing for increased reliance on electricity instead of oil, and making BC a leader once again in climate policy.

 

3. UNDRIP and Shared Decision-Making

The UN Declaration emphasizes Indigenous peoples' rights to live in dignity, to maintain and strengthen Indigenous institutions, cultures and traditions and to pursue self-determined development, in keeping with Indigenous needs and aspirations.

If elected, how will you improve relations and respect for Indigenous rights in BC?

Victoria Beacon Hill
Karen Bill, Liberal BC Liberals are committed to addressing issues of economic and social inequality faced
by indigenous peoples. We must act boldly in working with First Nations and the federal government to create new opportunities for Indigenous peoples.
Working with Indigenous peoples, we will ensure we don’t leave future generations with unresolved issues of rights and title. We want to clearly define how UNDRIP relates to land use decisions and existing case law regarding title held by Indigenous peoples and the right to self-determination.
And we actively support the right of First Nations to negotiate for the economic benefit
of their peoples with additional supports from the Province, including renewing capacity funding. We will provide financing mechanisms to enable First Nations to access affordable capital to co-invest in revenue generating economic opportunities, as well as prioritizing sector-specific job-training for Indigenous peoples.
Grace Lore, NDP No response received to date
Jenn Neilson, Green No response received to date
Jordan Reichert, Independent No response received to date

 

Oak Bay-Gordon Head
Florian Castle, Communist Party of BC No response received to date
Nicole Duncan, Green The Declaration Act confirms the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UN Declaration) as the framework for reconciliation as articulated by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and requires the provincial government to: take all measures necessary to ensure the laws of British Columbia are consistent with the UN Declaration; develop and implement an action plan in consultation and cooperation with Indigenous peoples to achieve the objectives of the UN Declaration; and, monitor progress through public annual reporting. The Declaration Act also enables new decision-making agreements between the Province of B.C. and Indigenous governing bodies. We commit to working in partnership with Indigenous people towards reconciliation.
Roxanne Helm, Liberal We must continue our journey of reconciliation to ensure that we don't saddle future generations with unresolved issues of rights and title.
Murray Rankin, NDP I was so proud of John Horgan’s government in becoming the first in Canada to enshrine the United Nations’ Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in law. I’ve dedicated a large part of my legal career to Indigenous law and treaty negotiation – supporting First Nations in self-governance. I’m running with John Horgan and the BC NDP because I know they are committed to moving further towards long-term agreements that provide great self-determination and extending BC’s support for cultural preservation and revitalization.

 

Saanich South
Kate O'Connor, Green The BC Greens feel that the DRIPA was a historic step in the fight to recognise and affirm indigenous rights. We are committed to working to ensure that the provincial government delivers on its commitment to create an action plan to implement the DRIPA.
Lana Popham, NDP No response received to date
Rishi Sharma, Liberal BC Liberals are committed to addressing issues of economic and social inequality faced by indigenous peoples. We must act boldly in working with First Nations and the federal government to create new opportunities for Indigenous peoples.
Working with Indigenous peoples, we will ensure we don’t leave future generations with unresolved issues of rights and title. We want to clearly define how UNDRIP relates to land use decisions and existing case law regarding title held by Indigenous peoples and the right to self-determination.
And we actively support the right of First Nations to negotiate for the economic benefit of their peoples with additional supports from the Province, including renewing capacity funding. We will provide financing mechanisms to enable First Nations to access affordable capital to co-invest in revenue generating economic opportunities, as well as prioritizing sector-specific job-training for Indigenous peoples.

 

Saanich North & the Islands
Zeb King, NDP No response received to date
Adam Olsen, Green I am proud to have worked to make the DRIPA a reality. The work is not done. Government needs to now change how it approaches the relationship with Indigenous people in BC. It needs to be a partnership not a paternalistic, government-knows-best mentality. The most important next step is to work closely with Indigenous leadership in the province to build an action plan to implement the DRIPA. The law is not enough, we need action!
Stephen P. Roberts, Liberal BC Liberals are committed to addressing issues of economic and social inequality faced by indigenous peoples. We must act boldly in working with First Nations and the federal government to create new opportunities for Indigenous peoples.
Working with Indigenous peoples, we will ensure we don’t leave future generations with unresolved issues of rights and title. We want to clearly define how UNDRIP relates to land use decisions and existing case law regarding title held by Indigenous peoples and the right to self-determination.
And we actively support the right of First Nations to negotiate for the economic benefit of their peoples with additional supports from the Province, including renewing capacity funding. We will provide financing mechanisms to enable First Nations to access affordable capital to co-invest in revenue generating economic opportunities, as well as prioritizing sector-specific job-training for Indigenous peoples.

 

Langford-Juan de Fuca
Gord Baird, Green The Green Party was the wedge in this past sitting of the Legislative Assembly that was able to use its position to get the Government to accept UNDRIP. I would continue to push for getting this long and intricate process started, and frankly am saddened deeply to see how the Government has so badly dropped the ball. We have governments, of equal or higher authority, different governance over intersecting territories and we need to braid the complexities together one strand at a time.
Kelly Darwin, Liberal BC Liberals are committed to addressing issues of economic and social inequality faced by indigenous peoples. We must act boldly in working with First Nations and the federal government to create new opportunities for Indigenous peoples.
Working with Indigenous peoples, we will ensure we don’t leave future generations with unresolved issues of rights and title. We want to clearly define how UNDRIP relates to land use decisions and existing case law regarding title held by Indigenous peoples and the right to self-determination.
And we actively support the right of First Nations to negotiate for the economic benefit of their peoples with additional supports from the Province, including renewing capacity funding. We will provide financing mechanisms to enable First Nations to access affordable capital to co-invest in revenue generating economic opportunities, as well as prioritizing sector-specific job-training for Indigenous peoples.
John Horgan, NDP One of the proudest moments of our government’s first three years in office came in late 2019, when BC became the first province to enshrine the United Nations’ Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in law. Bringing in this transformative legislation was an important step, but there is more work to do to translate these principles into real change for people. Our platform commits to doing this work. A re-elected NDP government is committed to: Moving further towards long-term agreements that provide greater self-determination:The Province’s relationship with Indigenous peoples will continue to move from short-term transactional arrangements to long-term agreements that recognize and support reconciliation, self-determination, and economic independence. Partnering with Indigenous peoples through evolving shared decision making: The 2019 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act has set the table for more meaningful shared decision making. As we move forward with key decisions on regional land and resource use allocation, we will partner with First Nations, providing a clear, stable and sustainable path for everyone to work together. Extending BC’s support for cultural preservation and revitalization: We will extend our funding for key projects designed to preserve and respect Indigenous cultures – including the retention and revitalization of First Nations languages, putting additional languages into BC’s curriculum, and reflecting Indigenous peoples’ history and cultures in provincial parks and wilderness areas. Connecting urban Indigenous peoples to their home communities: We will expand our support of Aboriginal Friendship Centres that serve the needs of local Indigenous communities while playing a vital role in connecting urban Indigenous peoples from across the province to their home communities. Improving Indigenous input on provincial policy and legislation: In consultation and cooperation with Indigenous leadership, our government will create a dedicated Secretariat to ensure new legislation and policies are consistent with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Tyson Reil Strandlund, Communist Party of BC No response received to date

 

Esquimalt-Metchosin
Mitzi Dean, NDP No response received to date
Andy Mackinnon, Green We'll commit to jointly implementing UNDRIP with BC's First Nations.
Desta McPherson, Independent No response received to date
RJ Senko, Liberal BC Liberals are committed to addressing issues of economic and social inequality faced by indigenous peoples. We must act boldly in working with First Nations and the federal government to create new opportunities for Indigenous peoples.
Working with Indigenous peoples, we will ensure we don’t leave future generations with unresolved issues of rights and title. We want to clearly define how UNDRIP relates to land use decisions and existing case law regarding title held by Indigenous peoples and the right to self-determination.
And we actively support the right of First Nations to negotiate for the economic benefit of their peoples with additional supports from the Province, including renewing capacity funding. We will provide financing mechanisms to enable First Nations to access affordable capital to co-invest in revenue generating economic opportunities, as well as prioritizing sector-specific job-training for Indigenous peoples.

 

Victoria-Swan Lake
Rob Fleming, NDP No response received to date
Annemieke Holthuis, Green No response received to date
Walt Parsons, Communist Party of BC No response received to date
Jenn Smith, Independent No response received to date
David Somerville, Liberal BC Liberals are committed to addressing issues of economic and social inequality faced by indigenous peoples. We must act boldly in working with First Nations and the federal government to create new opportunities for Indigenous peoples.
Working with Indigenous peoples, we will ensure we don’t leave future generations with unresolved issues of rights and title. We want to clearly define how UNDRIP relates to land use decisions and existing case law regarding title held by Indigenous peoples and the right to self-determination.
And we actively support the right of First Nations to negotiate for the economic benefit of their peoples with additional supports from the Province, including renewing capacity funding. We will provide financing mechanisms to enable First Nations to access affordable capital to co-invest in revenue generating economic opportunities, as well as prioritizing sector-specific job-training for Indigenous peoples.

 

4. Urban Highway Expansion

BC committed to shifting investments “from higher to lower-emitting types of transportation” when it signed the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change in 2016. Local government representatives called on the BC government to fully implement this policy at the 2019 Union of BC Municipalities Convention.

The just-published South Island Transportation Strategy aims for "fewer gas-powered and single-occupant vehicles on the road; more people walking and biking; an increased emphasis on public transportation ... a bold and lasting change in mobility."

If elected, what would you do to shift spending away from highway expansions and into public transit, cycling and walking? 

Victoria Beacon Hill
Karen Bill, Liberal A BC Liberal government would improve our roads, public transit and clean
transportation infrastructure, as part of the biggest infrastructure investment in BC history, to reduce congestion and improve travel for drivers and transit users. In
addition, we would anticipate electric transportation by ensuring charging stations are
widely available.
Active transportation is valued by British Columbians, which was why BC Liberal
governments invested $230 million in cycling grants and infrastructure across the
province. Through BikeBC, our cost-sharing program with communities, we provided $44 million to fund 91 projects.
Our lives have changed during this pandemic, and people need safe opportunities for
active transportation and outdoor recreation. Parks and protected areas play a
fundamental role in this, connecting us with our natural environment through
opportunities such as hiking or cycling.
Grace Lore, NDP No response received to date
Jenn Neilson, Green No response received to date
Jordan Reichert, Independent No response received to date

 

Oak Bay-Gordon Head
Florian Castle, Communist Party of BC No response received to date
Nicole Duncan, Green Our Green Party plan for livable cities includes policies for investing in transit, walkable neighbourhoods and active transportation. We would prioritize the creation of a regional transit strategy aimed at improving the availability and affordability of transit within and between cities. We are committed to working in partnership with local governments to fund projects such as bike lanes, parks, community spaces and pedestrian-only streets.
Roxanne Helm, Liberal Everything possible!!!!
Murray Rankin, NDP John Horgan and the BC NDP are making real progress on this issue. As part of our South Island Transportation Strategy and CleanBC, we’re committed to helping communities expand their network of active transportation as we move towards doubling trips taken via walking, biking and other kinds of active network by the year 2030. For example, in May 2019, the BC NDP government provided $1 million to the District of Saanich through the BikeBC program for buffered bike lanes between McKenzie Avenue and Torquay Drive – making it safer for cyclists and encouraging more people to cycle to get around. The government also built dedicated rapid bus lanes along Highway 1 through Victoria and Saanich. If re-elected, we’re going remove PST on e-bikes and we’ll continue to give rebates on electric vehicles. By 2040, every vehicle sold in BC will have to be zero-emission vehicles. We’ll make public transportation across BC free for children younger than 13. There’s more to be done, but I’m confident we’re on the right track!

 

Saanich South
Kate O'Connor, Green The BC Green party strategy involves (and I agree wholeheartedly with it) working with local governments and other stakeholders to establish a vision for sustainable transport in the south of Vancouver Island to overcome fractured decision making, to integrate planning for this growing region, and to invest in the expansion of public transport options to make transport links between Cowichan and CRD for example frequent and affordable.
Lana Popham, NDP No response received to date
Rishi Sharma, Liberal A BC Liberal government would improve our roads, public transit and clean
transportation infrastructure, as part of the biggest infrastructure investment in BC history, to reduce congestion and improve travel for drivers and transit users. In
addition, we would anticipate electric transportation by ensuring charging stations are
widely available.
Active transportation is valued by British Columbians, which was why BC Liberal
governments invested $230 million in cycling grants and infrastructure across the
province. Through BikeBC, our cost-sharing program with communities, we provided $44 million to fund 91 projects.
Our lives have changed during this pandemic, and people need safe opportunities for
active transportation and outdoor recreation. Parks and protected areas play a
fundamental role in this, connecting us with our natural environment through
opportunities such as hiking or cycling.

 

Saanich North & the Islands
Zeb King, NDP No response received to date
Adam Olsen, Green We definitely need a better balance on the investments we are making in transportation infrastructure. It’s important to note that it’s not necessarily the highway that is the problem but rather the internal combustion engine. That said, the BC Greens have outlined several comprehensive policy proposals in our sustainable cities platform that would achieve the outcomes this question is seeking. Diversifying the investments in active transportation options is certainly an important step. We need pedestrian and cycling friendly communities. Increased charging capacity for e-bikes, expanding car co-ops, investments in expansion of transit. Delivering on the Mayors request for a transportation commission to better govern transportation in the region. Also, we rely heavily on gas taxes to pay for infrastructure so we need to discuss the alternative funding formula such as the mobility pricing proposal studied by TransLink.
Stephen P. Roberts, Liberal A BC Liberal government would improve our roads, public transit and clean
transportation infrastructure, as part of the biggest infrastructure investment in BC history, to reduce congestion and improve travel for drivers and transit users. In
addition, we would anticipate electric transportation by ensuring charging stations are
widely available.
Active transportation is valued by British Columbians, which was why BC Liberal
governments invested $230 million in cycling grants and infrastructure across the
province. Through BikeBC, our cost-sharing program with communities, we provided $44 million to fund 91 projects.
Our lives have changed during this pandemic, and people need safe opportunities for
active transportation and outdoor recreation. Parks and protected areas play a
fundamental role in this, connecting us with our natural environment through
opportunities such as hiking or cycling.

 

Langford-Juan de Fuca
Gord Baird, Green I come at this question as a small business owner and a farmer who has a varying set of needs transportation wise. I gave up my personal car 6,000 kms ago according to my E-bike. This experience has shown the feasibility and restrictions in accessing my clients from Sooke to Ganges and Cobble Hill. We must electrify public transport. We must use existing infrastructure to provide preferential movement of public transport over the car. If it becomes easier to move on a bus than by car, then people will choose that. We need to support E-Bike transportation using our existing roads. On roads in rural areas such as in the Highlands, we need to give communities greater ability to determine the speed limits - something I am familiar with as I sit as a councillor in the District of Highlands.
Kelly Darwin, Liberal A BC Liberal government would improve our roads, public transit and clean
transportation infrastructure, as part of the biggest infrastructure investment in BC history, to reduce congestion and improve travel for drivers and transit users. In
addition, we would anticipate electric transportation by ensuring charging stations are
widely available.
Active transportation is valued by British Columbians, which was why BC Liberal
governments invested $230 million in cycling grants and infrastructure across the
province. Through BikeBC, our cost-sharing program with communities, we provided $44 million to fund 91 projects.
Our lives have changed during this pandemic, and people need safe opportunities for
active transportation and outdoor recreation. Parks and protected areas play a
fundamental role in this, connecting us with our natural environment through
opportunities such as hiking or cycling.
John Horgan, NDP Our government made record investments in expanding public transit across BC. This September StrongerBC - our economic recovery plan - provided significant new funding that will help communities build more bike lanes, paths, and trails and other new infrastructure to support active transportation. A re-elected NDP Government will build on this work by building new transit infrastructure, like additional bike paths, extended Skytrain lines, and more bus lanes. We’ll also invest in improving transit services creating new incentives to encourage more people to use public transit or bike to work. A re-elected NDP government is committed to: Delivering better transit for the South Island: We will implement the South Island Transportation Strategy, and provide more active transportation infrastructure, rapid bus service to the West Shore, and safety upgrades to the Malahat highway. Helping families get around with free transit up to and including age 12: We want to make it easier and more affordable for families to move about. That’s why we’ll make transit (Translink and BC Transit) throughout the province free for kids up to and including age 12. Making e-bikes more affordable: To help more people make the switch to active transportation, we will remove the PST on e-bikes. Expanding transit options for people in growing areas of the province: This includes increased connections within the Translink network for people living in the Fraser Valley and the Sea-to-Sky region, expanded West Coast Express service, and more service for the successful BC Bus North program for rural communities. Improving connections to Surrey and Langley:We’ll work with communities to complete the Skytrain expansion project and add new rail and rapid bus lines. Planning for future clean transit projects with long-lasting economic benefits: We’ll work with communities and regions to support planning and development of key projects, like high-speed transit links for the North Shore and the expansion of rail up the Fraser Valley – bringing cleaner transit and more construction jobs for BC workers. Promoting cleaner communities and better health through active transportation: We’ll work with communities to expand their networks of active transportation as we move towards our CleanBC goal of doubling trips taken via walking, biking and other kinds of active networks by the year 2030.
Tyson Reil Strandlund, Communist Party of BC No response received to date

 

Esquimalt-Metchosin
Mitzi Dean, NDP No response received to date
Andy Mackinnon, Green There's a lot about this on the Green Party website, but in short, we recognize the importance of public transit and walkable/bikeable communities, and oppose highway expansions. (Nobody anywhere anytime has ever permanently solved a traffic problem by building more highway!)
Desta McPherson, Independent No response received to date
RJ Senko, Liberal A BC Liberal government would improve our roads, public transit and clean
transportation infrastructure, as part of the biggest infrastructure investment in BC history, to reduce congestion and improve travel for drivers and transit users. In
addition, we would anticipate electric transportation by ensuring charging stations are
widely available.
Active transportation is valued by British Columbians, which was why BC Liberal
governments invested $230 million in cycling grants and infrastructure across the
province. Through BikeBC, our cost-sharing program with communities, we provided $44 million to fund 91 projects.
Our lives have changed during this pandemic, and people need safe opportunities for
active transportation and outdoor recreation. Parks and protected areas play a
fundamental role in this, connecting us with our natural environment through
opportunities such as hiking or cycling.

 

Victoria-Swan Lake
Rob Fleming, NDP No response received to date
Annemieke Holthuis, Green No response received to date
Walt Parsons, Communist Party of BC No response received to date
Jenn Smith, Independent No response received to date
David Somerville, Liberal A BC Liberal government would improve our roads, public transit and clean
transportation infrastructure, as part of the biggest infrastructure investment in BC history, to reduce congestion and improve travel for drivers and transit users. In
addition, we would anticipate electric transportation by ensuring charging stations are
widely available.
Active transportation is valued by British Columbians, which was why BC Liberal
governments invested $230 million in cycling grants and infrastructure across the
province. Through BikeBC, our cost-sharing program with communities, we provided $44 million to fund 91 projects.
Our lives have changed during this pandemic, and people need safe opportunities for
active transportation and outdoor recreation. Parks and protected areas play a
fundamental role in this, connecting us with our natural environment through
opportunities such as hiking or cycling.

 

5. Emission Reduction Targets

The British Columbia government has pledged to reduce emissions by 80 per cent from 2007 levels by 2050 through its CleanBC Plan. However, data released by the provincial government in 2018 says gross emissions totalled 67.9 megatonnes (Mt) of carbon dioxide equivalent , an increase of seven per cent since 2007 and an increase of 2.2 Mt from 2017.

It’s feasible that 2050 could be past many of our lifetimes. As a grandparent, I want to know: if elected, what actions will you take by 2024 to get BC back on track in meeting legislated emission reduction targets?

Victoria Beacon Hill
Karen Bill, Liberal BC Liberals will re-establish British Columbia as a global climate leader to make our
province a place where people have clean and green choices in transportation, buildings, and public services. We will ensure there is a comprehensive greenhouse gas strategy that reduces emissions while enabling our world-leading sustainable resource development and Indigenous land use.
Grace Lore, NDP No response received to date
Jenn Neilson, Green No response received to date
Jordan Reichert, Independent No response received to date

 

Oak Bay-Gordon Head
Florian Castle, Communist Party of BC No response received to date
Nicole Duncan, Green We are committed to making BC carbon neutral by 2045. This commitment sets us 5 years ahead of the federal government commitment and puts us in line with California, a leading jurisdiction on climate action; and, we will set interim targets to keep us on track, as well as sectoral targets for industry. We will also develop a robust strategy to meet the 2030 target, and develop an accountability framework to ensure we get there. We will take immediate steps to send a signal of our intent by ending government support for the fossil fuel industry. The BC Greens will act immediately to set an interim target for 2025 and develop, sectoral targets. We will also end oil and gas subsidies and implement a moratorium on fracking.
Roxanne Helm, Liberal Everything possible!!!
Murray Rankin, NDP I am fully committed to fighting climate change. We owe it to future generations. Together with Dr. Andrew Weaver, the BC NDP developed CleanBC, the most ambitious climate plan on the continent. We’ll reduce emissions by investing in BC carbon-capture technology, accelerating energy efficient retrofits, expanding our zero-emission vehicle program, and employing best-in-the-world emission detection. I’ve spent my life fighting for environmental protection and climate action as an environmental lawyer and activist, and I want to bring my voice to the BC NDP caucus.

 

Saanich South
Kate O'Connor, Green Our carbon emission targets go beyond this as we commit to be carbon neutral by 2045 and get rid of fossil fuel subsidies. By 2024 we will encourage walkable neighbourhoods, reinstate the scheduled increases in carbon tax and increase it by $10 per year. We will start to shift to a 100% ZEV passenger vehicle fleet for the BC government agencies and commercial vehicles.
Lana Popham, NDP No response received to date
Rishi Sharma, Liberal BC Liberals will re-establish British Columbia as a global climate leader to make our
province a place where people have clean and green choices in transportation, buildings, and public services. We will ensure there is a comprehensive greenhouse gas strategy that reduces emissions while enabling our world-leading sustainable resource development and Indigenous land use.

 

Saanich North & the Islands
Zeb King, NDP No response received to date
Adam Olsen, Green Cancel all government subsidies for the fossil fuel industry. This is the most important first step we can take. We need to follow up with reinstating the carbon tax increases. Also we have a big job ahead to address the challenges of BC Hydro.
Stephen P. Roberts, Liberal BC Liberals will re-establish British Columbia as a global climate leader to make our
province a place where people have clean and green choices in transportation, buildings, and public services. We will ensure there is a comprehensive greenhouse gas strategy that reduces emissions while enabling our world-leading sustainable resource development and Indigenous land use.

 

Langford-Juan de Fuca
Gord Baird, Green I have read the IPCC, and I have personally calculated the rate of emissions and what the carbon budget is to stay below the 1.5C mark. Anything is feasible as we have seen with the pandemic - that said the present cultural norms would certainly be changed to meet the 8 years remaining to decrease our emissions to 0. Is it likely - frankly I do not think so unless the foundation of some of our legislation are updated to match present day societies needs. Transformational change is needed, and needs to be demanded.
Kelly Darwin, Liberal BC Liberals will re-establish British Columbia as a global climate leader to make our
province a place where people have clean and green choices in transportation, buildings, and public services. We will ensure there is a comprehensive greenhouse gas strategy that reduces emissions while enabling our world-leading sustainable resource development and Indigenous land use.
John Horgan, NDP Our CleanBC is the strongest climate action plan on the continent. It will reduce our emissions by 40% by 2030 compared to 2007 levels. This is an ambitious target and we are committed to reaching it. That is one reason our 2020 platform doubles down on the CleanBC plan with specific measures to strengthen and expand it. The commitments in our platform related to reducing emissions and supporting the transition to a low-carbon economy total over $500 million in new spending over 3 years to support CleanBC - that’s in addition to the $1.3 billion previously committed to the plan. On top of that our government has committed billions of dollars in new infrastructure spending on a number of important projects, including transit projects, which will further support CleanBC goals. In addition the specific commitments we have made to lower emissions from industry and transportation which have been detailed in a previous answers, a re-elected NDP Government would: Invest in made-in-BC carbon capture technology: British Columbia entrepreneurs have already started the research and development work to prevent carbon emissions from polluting the atmosphere. We will support that work with strategic investments to further our net-zero emissions goal. Require greener buildings: We are already requiring new buildings and retrofits to be more energy efficient and cleaner – every new building constructed in BC must be net-zero ready by 2032. We will take the next step by empowering local governments to set their own carbon pollution performance standards for new buildings. And we will require realtors to provide energy efficiency information on listed homes to incent energy-saving upgrades and let purchasers know what energy bills they will face. Accelerate energy efficiency retrofits beginning now: We will spur more energy-efficiency upgrades with programs and incentives for both residential and commercial buildings – including PACE (Property Assessed Clean Energy) financing that allows homeowners to take out loans for efficiency upgrades and pay them back over time through annual property taxes. Making electric vehicles more affordable for more people: We’ll provide a new income-tested incentive on new and used zero-emission vehicles to get more people into the electric vehicle rebate program, regardless of their income. Increasing public vehicle charging availability: We will expand home and workplace charging through increased incentives and 'right-to-charge' legislation that gets charging infrastructure into more strata and apartment buildings.
Tyson Reil Strandlund, Communist Party of BC No response received to date

 

Esquimalt-Metchosin
Mitzi Dean, NDP No response received to date
Andy Mackinnon, Green Agreed 100%. Setting targets for 2050 is simply a way to avoid taking action now. Again, lots of information on the BC Greens website, but we have to protect existing natural carbon storage (forests, wetlands etc.) while radically reducing GHG production by moving away from fossil production and use.
Desta McPherson, Independent No response received to date
RJ Senko, Liberal BC Liberals will re-establish British Columbia as a global climate leader to make our
province a place where people have clean and green choices in transportation, buildings, and public services. We will ensure there is a comprehensive greenhouse gas strategy that reduces emissions while enabling our world-leading sustainable resource development and Indigenous land use.

 

Victoria-Swan Lake
Rob Fleming, NDP No response received to date
Annemieke Holthuis, Green No response received to date
Walt Parsons, Communist Party of BC No response received to date
Jenn Smith, Independent No response received to date
David Somerville, Liberal BC Liberals will re-establish British Columbia as a global climate leader to make our
province a place where people have clean and green choices in transportation, buildings, and public services. We will ensure there is a comprehensive greenhouse gas strategy that reduces emissions while enabling our world-leading sustainable resource development and Indigenous land use.